Butterflies and Moths

White-lined Sphinx moth
or Hyles lineata


White-lined Sphinx moth
or Hyles lineata


Showy Holomelina MOTH OR

Virbia ostenta
f6.3, 1X, 30 steps at 0.702mm canyon point campground, AZ

American snout or Libytheana carinenta

116 shots- Enlarge the image to see individual wing scales

American snout or Libytheana carinenta

143 shots

Papilio cresphontes
or Giant swallowtail

43 shots 3x magnification

Papilio cresphontes or
Giant swallowtail
wing scales

13 shots 4.5x magnification

lepidoptera is latin for = scale wings

Papilio rumiko or Giant swallowtail feeding on a Baldwin

At 3 1/2– 5 1/2 inches it is considered one of the largest butterflies in North America. The newest idea is this species used to called cresphontes but is now called rumiko. The theory is that the tails on the large wings along with the colorful eye dots allow these butterflies to fool predators into thinking that the rear of the insect looks like the head with the tail resembling antennas and the brightly colored spots which often have dark pupils resemble eyes. It’s also noted that the lines or bands lead the predators’ eyes towards its rear. The predator will attack the tail allowing the butterfly to escape relatively left intact.


Of the 24 species of swallowtail that occur in the United States, 13 have been found in Arizona.

Arizona bird dropping moth or
moPonometia elegantula

Front porch light

White Peacock Butterfly or Anartia jatrophae

by Micah Bodine
Identification, edited & commentary by William Bodine

The males of the species display a unique territorial behavior, in which they stake out a territory typically 15 meters in diameter that contains larval host plants. They perch in this area and aggressively protect it from other insects and other male white peacocks

Blue Cracker Butterfly or Hamadryas feronia

by Micah Bodine
Identification, edited & commentary by William Bodine

Adults feed on rotting fruit and often are perched facing down helping them to be camouflaged. The males are territorial and makes a cracking sound in response to another male.

Malachite Butterfly or
Siproeta stelenes

by Micah Bodine
Identification, edited & commentary by William Bodine

Named for the green colored mineral malachite, because of the green on the butterfly's wings. Adults feed on flower nectar, rotting fruit, dead animals, and bat dung (yum yum).

Red Rim butterfly or
Biblis hyperia

by Micah Bodine
Identification, edited & commentary by William Bodine


Tiger Moth or

Apantesis incorrupta

Found dead on the street. It was partially eaten